Summer Reading Roundup – If You Loved THE HELP

Today’s post by She Reads co-founder, Marbeth Whalen | @MarybethWhalen

The Help is a novel that captured the hearts and imaginations of a nation, the likes of which doesn’t come along often. When the movie came out on video, my husband and I sat our entire family down in front of it and insisted we watch it together. Because we live in the south and we don’t want to raise children who don’t know from whence we came. But The Help isn’t your only option for reading well-written novels that deal with the subjects of racial equality, social justice, and where human emotions fit into it all. Below are some novels you might want to put on your reading radar this summer:

The Dry Grass of August by Anna Jean Mayhew. (This one got on my radar because the author’s last name is my maiden name AND we hail from the same city. But we’re no relation, at least not that I know of.) I’ve heard good things about this one.

On a scorching day in August 1954, thirteen-year-old Jubie Watts leaves Charlotte, North Carolina, with her family for a Florida vacation. Crammed into the Packard along with Jubie are her three siblings, her mother, and the family’s black maid, Mary Luther. For as long as Jubie can remember, Mary has been there – cooking, cleaning, compensating for her father’s rages and her mother’s benign neglect, and loving Jubie unconditionally. Bright and curious, Jubie takes note of the anti-integration signs they pass, and of the racial tension that builds as they journey further south. But she could never have predicted the shocking turn their trip will take. Now, in the wake of tragedy, Jubie must confront her parents’ failings and limitations, decide where her own convictions lie, and make the tumultuous leap to independence…Infused with the intensity of a changing time, here is a story of hope, heartbreak, and the love and courage that can transform us – from child to adult, from wounded to indomitable.

Catfish Alley by Lynne Bryant. A bookseller I respect told me that if this one had come out before The Help, this was the book we’d have all been talking about. I’ll be reading this one soon.

A moving debut novel about female friendship, endurance, and hope in the South.

Roxanne Reeves defines her life by the committees she heads and the social status she cultivates. But she is keeping secrets that make her an outsider in her own town, always in search of acceptance. And when she is given a job none of the other white women want-researching the town’s African-American history for a tour of local sites-she feels she can’t say no.

Elderly Grace Clark, a retired black schoolteacher, reluctantly agrees to become Roxanne’s guide. Grace takes Roxanne to Catfish Alley, whose undistinguished structures are nonetheless sacred places to the black community because of what happened there. As Roxanne listens to Grace’s stories, and meets her friends, she begins to see differently. She is transported back to the past, especially to 1931, when a racist’s hatred for Grace’s brother leads to events that continue to change lives decades later. And as Roxanne gains an appreciation of the dreams, courage, and endurance of those she had so easily dismissed, her own life opens up in new and unexpected ways.

Saving Cee Cee Honeycutt by Beth Hoffman. An author told me that Beth Hoffman is truly one of the nicest people you’d ever meet. That right there made me buy her book. I’m not kidding. That and I’ve heard that it’s wonderful.

Twelve-year-old CeeCee is in trouble. For years she’s been the caretaker of her psychotic mother, Camille— the crown-wearing, lipstick-smeared laughingstock of an entire town. Though it’s 1967 and they live in Ohio, Camille believes it’s 1951 and she’s just been crowned the Vidalia Onion Queen of Georgia.

The day CeeCee discovers Camille in the front yard wearing a tattered prom dress and tiara as she blows kisses to passing motorists, she knows her mother has completely flipped. When tragedy strikes, Tootie Caldwell, a previously unknown great-aunt comes to CeeCee’s rescue and whisks her away to Savannah. Within hours of her arrival, CeeCee is catapulted into a perfumed world of prosperity and Southern eccentricities—a world that appears to be run entirely by women.

While Tootie is busy saving Savannah’s endangered historic homes from the wrecking ball, CeeCee encounters a cast of unforgettable, eccentric characters. From the mysterious Thelma Rae Goodpepper, who bathes in an outdoor tub under the watchful eyes of a voyeuristic peacock, to Oletta Jones, the all-knowing household cook, to Violene Hobbs, the loud-mouthed widow who entertains a local police officer in her yellow see-through peignoir, the women of Gaston Street keep CeeCee entertained and enthralled for an entire summer.

But CeeCee’s view of the world is challenged in ways she could have never imagined: there are secrets to keep, injustices to face, and loyalties to uphold. Just as she begins to find her ballast and experiences a sense of belonging, her newfound joy collides with the long-held fear that her mother’s legacy has left her destined for destruction.

Laugh-out-loud funny, at times heartbreaking, and written in a pitch-perfect voice, Saving CeeCee Honeycutt is a spirited Southern tale that explores the intricate frailties and strengths of female relationships while illuminating the journey of a young girl who loses her mother but finds many others.

The Improper Life of Bezellia Grove by Susan Gregg Gilmore. I heard Susan speak about this book, which she said was inspired by a random introduction at a dinner party. The woman explained that her name was Bezellia, and then went on to explain the history of her name. And Susan knew she had the beginnings of a novel on her hands.

Nobody in Nashville has a bigger name to live up to than Bezellia Grove. As a Grove, she belongs to one of city’s most prominent families and is expected to embrace her position in high society. That means speaking fluent French, dancing at cotillions with boys from other important families, and mastering the art of the perfect smile.

Also looming large is her given name Bezellia, which has been passed down for generations to the first daughter born to the eldest Grove. The others in the long line of Bezellias shortened the ancestral name to Bee, Zee or Zell. But Bezellia refuses all nicknames and dreams that one day she, too, will be remembered for her original namesake’s courage and passion.

Though she leads a life of privilege, being a Grove is far from easy. Her mother hides her drinking but her alcoholism is hardly a secret. Her father, who spends long hours at work, is distant and inaccessible. For as long as she can remember, she’s been raised by Maizelle, the nanny, and Nathaniel, the handyman. To Bezellia, Maizelle and Nathaniel are cherished family members. To her parents, they will never be more than servants.

Relationships are complicated in 1960s Nashville, where society remains neatly ordered by class, status and skin color. Black servants aren’t supposed to eat at the same table as their white employers. Black boys aren’t supposed to make conversation with white girls. And they certainly aren’t supposed to fall in love. When Bezellia has a clandestine affair with Nathaniel’s son, Samuel, their romance is met with anger and fear from both families. In a time and place where rebelling against the rules carries a steep price, Bezellia Grove must decide which of her names will be the one that defines her.

Beyond Molasses Creek by Nicole Seitz. Nicole is a gentle soul, a gifted artist, and a writer who weaves wisdom into her words. This latest offering by her is evidence of all three.

Three lives are bound by a single book . . . and the cleansing waters of Molasses Creek.

Having traveled to the ends of the earth as a flight attendant, Ally Green has finally returned to the Lowcountry to bury her father as well as the past. But Vesey Washington is still living across the creek, and theirs is a complicated relationship-he was once her best friend . . . and also part of the reason she’s stayed away so long. When Ally discovers a message her father left behind asking her to quit running, it seems her past isn’t through with her yet.

As Ally’s wandering spirit wrestles with a deep longing to flee again, a young woman on the other side of the world escapes her life of slavery in the rock quarries of Nepal. A mysterious sketchbook leads Sunila Kunari to believe there’s more to her story than she’s ever been told, and she’s determined to follow the truth wherever it leads her.

A deep current intertwines the lives of these three souls, and a destiny of freedom, faith, and friendship awaits them all on the banks of Molasses Creek.

Question for you: what Southern novel have you read and enjoyed recently?

About Marybeth Whalen

Marybeth Whalen is the co-founder of She Reads, mother of six, and life-long reader. She is also the author of two novels with a third out in July: The Mailbox, She Makes It Look Easy, and The Guest Book.

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7 Responses to Summer Reading Roundup – If You Loved THE HELP

  1. ShellySCantrell June 28, 2012 at 10:17 am #

    I am loving “The River Witch” (our June Book Club selection). I recently enjoyed “On Folly Beach” by Karen White.

    Since my husband and I got married on Folly, drove up the coast and spent our 1st honeymoon night in the Charleston Room at Sunset Inn on Sunset (TMI?) and spent the rest of our honeymoon on Ocracoke…

    I am excited that my next read is Marybeth Whalen’s “The Guest Book” (Connections to Sunset)–and she is not paying me to say this ; )

    Then, I’ll look forward to picking up Nicole Seitz’s “Beyond Molasses Creek” (there is a Molasses Creek on Ocracoke).

    And by the time August rolls around, I’ll be ready for Mayhew’s “The Dry Grass of August.” I’m SO drawn to the cover and am diggin’ the synopsis as well. Is it any coincidence that my hubby and I got married in August?!?!? : )

    I’ve got my whole summer reading schedule planned out ; )

    Oh wait! I don’t know what the Aug. book club selection is… hmmmmm… perhaps I’ll have to work in another one for August. sigh… lol

    SHE READS ROCKS!

  2. Heather June 28, 2012 at 10:17 am #

    Bloodroot is an amazing Southern novel by Amy Greene. I enjoyed recently enjoyed The River Witch and Sea Change, both of which have Southern settings.

  3. Beth@sportsmomma June 28, 2012 at 10:17 am #

    These all look great. Going to check into adding them to my Nook reading list! One of my absolute favorite books (even thought it’s a “children’s book) is Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor- “The vivid story of a black family whose warm ties to each other and their land give them strength to defy rural Southern racism during the Depression. . . . Entirely through its own internal development, the novel shows the rich inner rewards of black pride, love, and independence despite the certainty of outer defeat.” —Booklist (starred review)

    Thanks for all the recommendations. Can’t wait to check them all out!!

  4. Debbie Hearne June 28, 2012 at 10:17 am #

    I love Beyond Molasses Creek and highly recommend it and all of Nicole Seitz books!

  5. PatriciaW June 28, 2012 at 10:17 am #

    I’m struck by how many books have a young white girl, child of a dysfunctional family, cared for and largely reared by the Black maid. I know that happened in history, maybe more than I want acknowledge, but I’m wondering where the other stories are. The one about the feisty maid who stood by and watched as the child darn near killed herself. Where are the parents who forbid their child to have any kind of personal relationship with the help? Where are the sons and what types of relationships did they have?

    But there are some interesting ones here. Thanks for the list.

  6. Anna Jean Mayhew July 15, 2012 at 10:17 pm #

    Dear Marybeth Mayhew Whalen,

    Thank you for recommending The Dry Grass of August. I found out about SheReads from Connie Kuhn, who I met at “Writing in Place” at Wofford College this weekend…so glad she told me about this wonderful site.

    Patricia W, I totally understand your comment, and just wanted to say that I began my novel in 1987…took me 18 years to finish it; took my agent 3+ years to sell it, then there was a year and a half of lead time, so 24 years after I began it, I finally had it in my hands. I didn’t set out to write a book that would be about a young white girl, a middle aged Black maid, a dysfunctional family, etc., but over the years, that’s what it became. By the time it made it to print, many other books on similar topics had been published. I like the ideas you propose, and I hope someone (you? are you a writer?) will write such books. Thanks for posting!

    I’ll certainly continue to follow SheReads.

    Anna Jean Mayhew, author of The Dry Grass of August

  7. Ariel July 16, 2012 at 10:17 pm #

    I just now saw this comment, Anna! I’m so glad you stopped by and I hope we sent a lot of readers your way. I’ve heard wonderful things about your novel and it’s been on my “to-buy” list for a while. Must go out and pick up a copy asap.

    Ariel

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